(via blazn)

prettyboyshyflizzy:

whitepeoplestealingculture:

ohdaesusie:

Tags: spiders

bogleech:

florafaunagifs:

Leaf bug (Phyllium giganteum)

The constant wobbling as they move is a part of their disguise, making it seem as though the “leaf” is only moving because of a light breeze.

If you blow on one it will also shake around in the hopes of matching any actual surrounding leaves

(via iguanamouth)

Anonymous said: Have you ever had an imaginary friend? :D

thefrogman:

owlturdcomix:

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Owl Turd Comix by Shenanigansen [website | twitter | facebook]

  • Me: I feel like drawing
  • Me: *draws*
  • Me: What the fuck is that?

queen-of-love-and-beauty:

"I don’t wear makeup so I don’t have to waste like an hour in front of the mirror every morning hahahaha"

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"open books not legs"

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"why have tequila shots when you can have tea?"

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"As always, late with Starbucks"

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"modest is hottest"

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"I’m not like those girls”

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(via officialdashconuk)

hypatiasclubhouse:

Flossie Wong-Staal (B. August 27, 1947)

A key figure in recognizing the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) as the cause of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), molecular biologist and virologist Flossie Wong-Staal was born Yee Ching Wong in China. She was the first woman in her family to attend university; she pursued higher education at UCLA, earning her a degree in bacteriology and a doctorate in molecular biology. Her contribution to the areas of bacteriology and retroviruses has been vital to understanding HIV and AIDS, and paved the way for later advancements.

Wong-Staal was the first scientist to clone HIV. After receiving her doctorate, she began to research retroviruses at the National Cancer Institute (NCI). In 1983, she and her team identified HIV as the cause of AIDS. Two years later, she cloned and genetically mapped the entire virus, both crucial steps in developing HIV tests that screen donated blood and test people.

Later, she left NCI to become the Florence Riford Chair in AIDS Research at the University of California, San Diego in 1990. There, Wong-Staal continued researching HIV and AIDS. In 1994, she was elected to the convocation of Academia Sinica, a top research institution in Taiwan. As part of the convocation, Wong-Staal helped shape the country’s policies on academic research and conducted public research. That same year, she also became chair of the UCSD Center for AIDS Research and was elected to be a member of the Institute of Medicine of the U.S. National Academies, an influential nonprofit organization that gives unbiased, authoritative advice to the nation’s decision makers and the public. During her time at UCSD, she focused her research on gene therapy and developed a protocol to repress HIV in stem cells, the second such protocol to be funded by the U.S. government.

Wong-Staal retired from UCSD in 2002 with the title professor emerita. She then became vice president and chief scientific officer of Immusol, a drug development company that she co-founded in San Diego. Wong-Staal renamed the company iTherX Pharmaceuticals and switched its focus to improving treatments for hepatitis C. The acclaimed scientist continues to contribute to the areas of bacteriology and retroviruses through her extensive work at iTherX. [x]

(via womenwhokickass)

jerksuke:

[x]

(via pwnator)

deantrippe:

A few of my favorite title cards from Batman: The Animated Series.

(via marcusto)

scientificillustration:

bonedahlia:

hrokr:

Three dog skulls from ‘Secrets of Bones’ hosted by Ben Garrod. The first image shows a regular dog skull; this contains both collagen, an organic compound, and calcium phosphate, a mineral compound.

In the images with the red gloves, another skull has been left in an oven for a few days. This has taken out all of the organic compounds, leaving just the mineral compounds. As you can see, this bone is too brittle to be of structural use.

In the images with the blue gloves, a skull has been soaked in formic acid for over a month. This removed the calcium phosphate from the bone but leaves the collagen. The surprising result is a very flexible skull.

Whaaaat. That is awesome.

If you haven’t seen ‘Secrets of Bones’ I’d highly recommend it. Here are links to the episodes on YouTube:

S01 E01 Size Matters

S01 E02 Down To Earth

S01 E03 Into The Air

S01 E04 Sensing The World

S01E05 Food For Thought